During the pandemic, fewer people by far have been making ordinary appointments with the dermatologist to have their skin checked. However, some skin conditions can become much worse if they are neglected. Summer-stressed skin may also need attention. In general, people should consult a dermatologist if there is a persistent change in a spot on the skin. People with darker skin should make sure that they consult an expert like our guest who is familiar with the appearance of problems like eczema, lupus or melanoma on pigmented skin. 

What to Do for Summer-Stressed Skin:

Hot weather in combination with humidity can create the perfect conditions for certain skin problems. Yeast infections such as jock itch or underbreast rash called intertrigo are common signs of summer-stressed skin. Are there remedies that can help prevent these problems? Which treatments work best against fungal infections?

Bikini Bumps:

Whether or not you have been to the beach this summer, bikini bumps are not unusual in summer-stressed skin. Another condition, razor bumps, has a similar cause but is treated quite differently. Both types of bumps occur when shaved hairs curl back under the surface of the skin as they grow out. This can be quite irritating. Find out how to manage it.

Managing “Maskne:”

It is not your imagination: face masks can actually make acne worse. That said, the mask is important for protecting people from COVID-19 transmission. What kinds of treatments can help most? We also discuss the fact that acne affects adults as well as adolescents. Moreover, dermatologists now have evidence that diet makes a difference. Cutting down on sugar, refined carbs and dairy products can lead to fewer blemishes.

This Week’s Guest:

Dr. Crystal Aguh is an Assistant Professor of Dermatology and Director of the Ethnic Skin Program at the Johns Hopkins School of Medicine. Dr Aguh’s area of research focuses primarily on skin conditions that disproportionately affect minority populations, with particular emphasis on alopecia (hair loss). She has authored two books on hair loss and has published multiple peer-reviewed journal articles on these subjects.

As a result of her work, Dr. Aguh is the recipient of numerous prestigious research awards & grants from the National Institutes of Health (NIH), Skin of Color Society, Johns Hopkins Medical Institutions and the Dermatology Foundation. Dr. Aguh received her undergraduate degree from Duke University and earned her medical degree from the University of Pennsylvania School of Medicine, earning induction into Alpha Omega Alpha Honor Society. Dr. Aguh completed her residency at Johns Hopkins School of Medicine.

Listen to the Podcast:

The podcast of this program will be available Monday, August 10, 2020, after broadcast on August 8. The show can be streamed online from this site and podcasts can be downloaded for free. CDs may be purchased at any time after broadcast for $9.99.

Buy the CD

Download the mp3, with extra questions on why quarantine is the perfect storm for hair loss, supplements that may cause skin reactions, and how stress affects your hair and your skin. 

Watch a brief welcome from Joe & Terry

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